Author Interview and Spotlight: Mary Keliikoa

derailed
Good morning everyone. Today I have an author interview with Mary Keliikoa to share.  First a bit about her latest book, Derailed. How cool is the cover? I have not read this one yet but it sounds like a great start to a new series.

By Mary Keliikoa
Camel Press; May 12, 2020
Trade paperback: $15.95
Pages: 236
You haven’t heard of private detective Kelly Pruett yet, but she’s about to join ranks of
mystery’s most clever and crafty female sleuths, such as Sue Grafton’s Kinsey Milhone, Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum or Alexander McCall Smith’s Precious Ramotswe.
Pruett reflects the real dilemmas of modern women in DERAILED: A P.I. Kelly Pruett
Mystery (Camel Press; May 12, 2020). Pruett must balance between being a single mother to her deaf daughter and following in her father’s footsteps as a private investigator.
After years of being her father’s apprentice, Pruett has inherited the family private detective agency. Dad never trained her for a major murder investigation; serving divorce papers and long stakeouts with her basset hound are more her speed. Her ex-husband—and his mother—think her work is too risky. But detective work is in her blood; puzzles are her passion. When a grieving mother begs her to investigate her daughter’s death, how can she refuse?
As Kelly sets out to prove herself, and find something to call her own outside of marriage and motherhood, she realizes she’s being stalked. Taking a frying pan to the face jars her into the realization that she’s stronger than anyone believes—even herself. Dad wasn’t the only Pruett with pit bull tendencies when it comes to solving a case, including one with ties to Portland’s BDSM subculture. As sordid secrets emerge, she must decide: is justice worth it?

Here’s what readers are saying:

“It’s that perfect blend of personal and professional that makes Derailed a welcome addition to the genre. I can’t wait to follow both Kelly and Keliikoa’s careers.”—Kellye Garrett, Anthony, Agatha, and Lefty Award-winning author, Hollywood Homicide

“Derailed has it all: an engaging heroine, a twisty, twisted crime, and plenty of food for thought about families and their secrets. I loved this debut and can’t wait to read about Kelly Pruett’s next case.”— Kristen Lepionka, Shamus Award-winning author, the Roxane Weary mystery series

“Mary Keliikoa’s debut novel is an important addition to the PI genre – strong with voice, a compelling protagonist in KellyPruett, and unforgettable family secrets. Derailed was hard to put down – and I can’t wait to read the next book in this crackling new series.” — Alex Segura, author, Blackout and Miami Midnight

Onto the author interview….(these questions were provided by the publisher for this post, I have not read the book yet myself) 

Q. You have owned several businesses in the past. Do you keep a finger in business or is writing now your full-time occupation?
A. I am the VP of a distribution company my husband and I have owned for 19 years, and I continue to work a few hours most week days. I enjoy the connection with our staff, we employ nearly 40 people. But I’m also very blessed to set my own schedule and writing is a big part of every day.
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Serena’s Poetry Challenge July 2020: If You Should Go by Countee Cullen

As part of Serena’s Poetry Reading Challenge I will be sharing the poem I enjoyed the most that month on the last Tuesday of each month.
poetry

One of the easiest, and possibly most difficult, will be getting people to sign up to read a poem-a-day through the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day service. The challenge is to read a poem-a-day for a week once per month and write about which poems were your favorite and why. You can write up a short blurb on your Facebook page, Twitter, Instagram, or your blog. I’d love for you to share your experience in the comments each month.

I took this poetry challenge on for 2020 and have been reading a poem a day in my emails. So far this year I have only shared one poem here on my blog due to everything going on but I’m hoping to begin posting a poem on the last Tuesday of each like I initially planned to. The poem I enjoyed most lately was one that I read in June called If You Should Go by Countee Cullen.

This was my first time reading this poet and I enjoyed the melancholy feel to it. It is a short and bittersweet poem. I especially like these lines…“Go quietly; a dream …When done, should leave no trace”.  What do you think?

IMG_0504 (400x600)

If You Should Go by Countee Cullen
Love, leave me like the light,
The gently passing day;
We would not know, but for the night,
When it has slipped away.

So many hopes have fled,
Have left me but the name
Of what they were. When love is dead,
Go thou, beloved, the same.

Go quietly; a dream
When done, should leave no trace
That it has lived, except a gleam
Across the dreamer’s face.

You can read the poem here at Poets.org.

You can sign up for a Poem A Day over by clicking here.

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Nothing in this post is available for download. The photo is my own.

Sunday Post/Mailbox Monday 7/26/2020: Goodbye July

sunday (249x249)mm
The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ Caffeinated Book Reviewer. It’s a chance to share news. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog…
Mailbox Monday is the gathering place for readers to share the books that came in their mailbox during the last week. Warning: Mailbox Monday can lead to envy, toppling TBR piles and humongous wish lists….

Good morning all. I can’t believe July has nearly come and gone. I hope you are doing well. I’ve not been on blog land much lately, between work and everything else sometimes it’s hard to find time and motivation to blog.
Not much happening here thankfully just the usual. The weather has been very hot and humid and in the high 90’s lately. I’ve been watching tv and crocheting alot inside with the air conditioning. For now I’m still working from home for over 100 days which I’m grateful for. I actually started going to the office for a few hours on Saturday mornings when it’s empty. It’s weird going back after so long and feels very odd working alone, it feels surreal. Usually there’s 18 people in my department and a few hundred in the building during normal life pre-quarantine.

My husband is back to work now with social distancing from his co-workers and wearing masks but it still stresses me out to no end. He got tested just to be extra careful since he’s been back to work and it took over 14 days to get the results back, negative thankfully but that’s a long time to wait on results.

Anyway, we still go for walks often early in the day to avoid people, below is a pic I took recently at the park.
garden

onto my bookish updates…

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The House We Grew Up In by Lisa Jewell

thehousesource: purchased
title: The House We Grew Up In
author: Lisa Jewell (Twitter)
genre: fiction/family issues
pages: 386
published: August 12th 2014
first line: Tuesday 2nd November 2010
rated: 4 out of 5 stars
starstarstarstar

blurb:
OUR HOUSE. OUR FAMILY. OUR SECRETS.

Meet the picture-perfect Bird family: pragmatic Meg, dreamy Beth, and towheaded twins Rory and Rhys, one an adventurous troublemaker, the other his slighter, more sensitive counterpart. Their father is a sweet, gangly man, but it’s their beautiful, free-spirited mother Lorelei who spins at the center. In those early years, Lorelei tries to freeze time by filling their simple brick house with precious mementos. Easter egg foils are her favorite. Craft supplies, too. She hangs all of the children’s art, to her husband’s chagrin.

Then one Easter weekend, a tragedy so devastating occurs that, almost imperceptibly, it begins to tear the family apart. Years pass and the children have become adults, while Lorelei has become the county’s worst hoarder. She has alienated her husband and children and has been living as a recluse. But then something happens that beckons the Bird family back to the house they grew up in—to finally understand the events of that long-ago Easter weekend and to unearth the many secrets hidden within the nooks and crannies of home.

my thoughts:

After having read Then She Was Gone this past January I knew I wanted to read Lisa Jewell again. The House We Grew Up In centers on the Bird family and their secrets, heartache and healing. The story goes back and forth from past to present day as we get each family member’s story. The matriarch of the house is a hoarder. When the children were growing up Lorelei seemed like an eccentric stay at home mom with a house full of knick knacks and the walls covered in her children’s drawings, but as the years passed this turned into a full on hoard situation. Her husband Colin is a quiet teacher who turns a blind eye to the hoarding, their twins sons are Rhys and Rory and the daughters are Meg and Beth. The neighbor Vicky and her children also become part of the Bird’s lives.

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