Gulp By Mary Roach

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source: Purchased
title: Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal
author: Mary Roach (Twitter)
genre: non-fiction/science
pages: 348
published: 2013
first line: In 1968, on the Berkeley campus of the University of California, six young men undertook an irregular and unprecedented act.
rated: 4 out of 5 stars
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Blurb:
The alimentary canal — the much-maligned tube from mouth to rear — is as taboo, in its way, as the cadavers in Stiff, and as surreal as the universe of zero gravity explored in Packing for Mars. In Gulp we meet the scientists who tackle the questions no one else thinks —or has the courage —to ask. How much can you eat before your stomach bursts? Why doesn’t the stomach digest itself? Can wine tasters really tell a $10 bottle from a $100 bottle? Why is crunchy food so appealing? Can constipation kill you? Did it kill Elvis? We go on location to a pet food taste-test lab, a fecal transplant, and into a live stomach to observe the fate of a meal. Like all of Roach’s books, Gulp is as much about human beings as it is about human bodies.

My thoughts:
Mary Roach one of those authors I discovered through book blogging years ago. I have been meaning to read Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers for a while, but I had a copy of Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal on my shelves and finally dove into it. I have zero recollection of purchasing this book, but I know I bought it at some point a few years back.

This was an interesting reading experience. The author has a knack for infusing humor into her writing, she grossed me out a little but also made me laugh.

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May 9 Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Things On Your Reading Wishlist

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Happy Tuesday. This week’s TTT topic is: Ten Things On Your Reading Wishlist (if you could make authors write about these things you would. Could be a specific type of character, an issue tackled, a time period, a certain plot, etc.)

Here are my picks with a few examples from books I have read….

1. May/December Age Gaps in Romance
Romances where the woman is a few years older than her love interest. When this is written well, it really works. I like it. Give me more.
Examples: Jane’s Melody and On the Island.

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2. Sad Endings
It’s okay if a main character dies at the end or if a couple decides that even though they love each other, it just won’t work. Go ahead, break my heart a little. I can take it.
Example: Nights in Rodanthe 
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3. Characters With Physical Disabilities/Illness
One of the reasons I enjoyed The Fault in Our Stars so much is that John Green tackled the topic of cancer with grace and respect. (TFIOS can also go with #2 on my list.) I have read a few other books where a main character has mental illness like depression or PTSD and those were well done. I’d like to read more like that or ones where a central character has a physical disability.
Examples: The Fault in Our Stars and I Know This Much Is True By Wally Lamb
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The Sunday Post 5/7/17: My updates, crochet and Bon Jovi

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The Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba @ Caffeinated Book Reviewer. It’s a chance to share news. A post to recap the past week, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up for the week on our blog…

Good morning everyone 🙂 I hope you’re all doing well. I’ve been trying to play catch up in blog land this weekend. I find that sitting at the computer all day at work, 40 hours a week, leaves me not wanting to get onto my computer at home. *note to self invest in a laptop*

On a bookish note, I have been reading and crocheting when I’m home, mostly crocheting. I am in the middle of two books at the moment, both non-fiction and both enjoyable.

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Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison by Piper Kerman and Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach. I have to say Gulp is really very good, I hope to have the reviews up in a few weeks once I am finished reading. Who knew there was so much to discuss when it comes to digestion?

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Pablo Neruda: If You Forget Me

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Pablo Neruda breaks my heart in the best way. I can’t pick a favorite, but If You Forget Me is up there. His work is best read in Spanish as he wrote it, there is something that gets lost in translation but the work is still beautiful nonetheless in English. He evokes emotion with his words and I dip into my little Neruda collection from time to time just to savor it.

everything carries me to you,
as if everything that exists,
aromas, light, metals,
were little boats
that sail
toward those isles of yours that wait for me.
-read the poem in its entirety here

What do you think of this one?

April is National Poetry Month, follow this link for more.

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disclaimer:
The photo above is my own and is not to be removed from this post.

Killing The Love

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Seeing how April is National Poetry Month, I wanted to share a few of my favorite poems these few weeks.  I like Anne Sexton so much because her poetry is so raw. She put it all out there and there is something to be said for that. Her poems are passionate and intense.

A snippet from a favorite of hers called “Killing the Love”. 

I am the love killer,
I am murdering the music we thought so special,
that blazed between us, over and over.
I am murdering me, where I kneeled at your kiss.
I am pushing knives through the hands
that created two into one.
Our hands do not bleed at this,
they lie still in their dishonor….

Read the poem in its entirety here: https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/killing-the-love/

What do you think of this one? Do you have a favorite Anne Sexton poem, or a favorite by another poet?

Thanks for stopping by, enjoy your day.

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disclaimer:
The photo above is my own and not to be removed from this post.