Author Guest Post: Discoucia by Nick Lovelock

Hello blog friends. Please join me in welcoming author Nick Lovelock to my blog today as he stops by while on virtual tour to discuss his inspiration behind writing his book, Discoucia.

NicholasLovelock_Banner
First,  bit about the book….

Discoucia: A Victorianish Fairytale

Revolution, romance and technological wonders are all in a day’s work for the decorated hero of Alavonia, Sir Arthur Pageon.

An acclaimed explorer and inventor, Sir Arthur Pageon takes his unofficial role as defender of the realm of Alavonia very seriously. A fantastical world, Alavonia is home to the Discoucian Monarchy, as well as monstrous creatures and secretive academies for the highly gifted.

Upon returning from his most recent exploits aboard on his personal flying galleon The Nostradamus, Pageon is treated to a hero’s welcome and celebratory procession through the streets of Alavonia’s capital, Evermore. Little does Pageon know he’s being followed by a mysterious group known as the Purple Guard, whose devious leader is his estranged sister, Queen Lily Pageon of Harrha Island. Fiercely intelligent, Lily specialises in dastardly technological inventions with the aim of bringing down the Discoucian Monarchy so that she may reign as its dictator. However, the heir to the throne is one Princess Josephine Olandine, whose youth and royal position masks her role in the Discoucian Secret Service.

Joining forces, Princess Josephine and Sir Arthur’s adventures will take them across the whole of Alavonia — from the fog-bound shores of Karga, to the secret underground shanty town beneath the frozen prison of Icester, south to the verdant city of Proceur and from there to the affluent Starfall Academy — in their quest to foil Lily’s revolutionary plans.

Onto the guest post….

Inspiration for Discoucia

The World of Discoucia was always going to be an amalgamation of Britain and America, since at one point in time they were both ruled by the same monarch and its thirteen original colonies seem to have a still-English feel in comparison to later and more modern cities. The age seems to be early 1800s, with High King Olandine being inspired by William IV since he was the king that preceded Victoria. The land really is all about hundreds of different references to popular culture put in their respective places.

Continue reading

I Am Legend by Richard Matheson

legend
source: purchased
title: I Am Legend
author: Richard Matheson
published: 1954
pages: 161
first line: On those cloudy days, Robert Neville was never sure when the sunset came, and sometimes they were in the streets before he could get back.
rated: 5 out of 5
1blustar1blustar1blustar1blustar1blustar

blurb:

It seems strange to find a 1954 vampire novel in Millennium’s “SF Masterworks” classic reprints series. I Am Legend, though, was a trailblazing and later much imitated story that reinvented the vampire myth as SF. Without losing the horror, it presents vampirism as a disease whose secrets can be unlocked by scientific tools. The hero Robert Neville, perhaps the last uninfected man on Earth, finds himself in a paranoid nightmare. By night, the bloodthirsty undead of small-town America besiege his barricaded house: their repeated cry “Come out, Neville!” is a famous SF catchphrase. By day, when they hide in shadow and become comatose, Neville gets out his wooden stakes for an orgy of slaughter. He also discovers pseudoscientific explanations, some rather strained, for vampires’ fear of light, vulnerability to stakes though not bullets, loathing of garlic, and so on. What gives the story its uneasy power is the gradual perspective shift which shows that by fighting monsters Neville is himself becoming monstrous–not a vampire but something to terrify vampires and haunt their dreams as a dreadful legend from the bad old days. I Am Legend was altered out of recognition when filmed as The Omega Man (1971), starring Charlton Heston. Avoid the movie; read the book. –David Langford

my thoughts:

Hello blog friends, I have been MIA and missed you all these few weeks but I did manage to read I Am Legend and wanted to share my thoughts on it. I’ve been busy with the usual work, family and just enjoying the summer. We even went on a mini-vacation to the beach last weekend. I’ll share pics on a Sunday post soon and I’ll be blog hopping this weekend and catching up.

Anyway, I picked I Am Legend out of left field really, it wasn’t a book I even planned on reading anytime soon but I found myself in a reading slump and this one helped get me out of that.
Richard Matheson wrote I Am Legend in 1954 and he set his futuristic post-apocalyptic thriller in 1976. The protagonist is Robert Neville, who has lived alone for a few years after losing his wife to a virus that infected most of Earth’s population and turned them into the living dead. The virus was thought to have been spread by mosquitoes after a war. Neville lives boarded up in his home, drinking often to ease the pain of his lone existence. He ventures out during daylight in search of food and supplies while also killing vampires. He spends his days trying to figure out the virus and how to cure it. I felt bad for him from the start. You get to see his past through a few flashbacks. I felt that Matheson wrote Neville’s loneliness and desolation masterfully and he was really creative with his storyline.

Horror he had adjusted to. But monotony was the greater obstacle, he realized it now, understood at long last. And understanding it seemed to give him a sort of quiet peace, a sense of having spread all the cards on his mental table, examined them, and settled conclusively on the desired hand.
p. 101, I Am Legend, Richard Matheson

Continue reading

The Bazaar of Bad Dreams by Stephen King

FullSizeRender (2)
source: purchased
title: The Bazaar of Bad Dreams
author: Stephen King
published: November, 2015
pages: 495
rated:4 out of 5
1blustar1blustar1blustar1blustar

blurb:
A master storyteller at his best—the O. Henry Prize winner Stephen King delivers a generous collection of stories, several of them brand-new, featuring revelatory autobiographical comments on when, why, and how he came to write (or rewrite) each story.

Since his first collection, Nightshift, published thirty-five years ago, Stephen King has dazzled readers with his genius as a writer of short fiction. In this new collection he assembles, for the first time, recent stories that have never been published in a book. He introduces each with a passage about its origins or his motivations for writing it.

There are thrilling connections between stories; themes of morality, the afterlife, guilt, what we would do differently if we could see into the future or correct the mistakes of the past….

my thoughts:

You might know that Stephen King is one of my favorite authors. I first began reading his short stories in my early twenties and was hooked since. I brought The Bazaar of Bad Dreams on vacation last month and I found it the perfect book to dip in and out of while relaxing in the sun. This is a collection of 20 short stories, some brand new, others previously published. King also includes his personal comments on each story which gives it all a nice touch.

Continue reading

Isabella’s Heiress by N.P. Griffiths

9781909477759-Perfect_Isabllea Heiress.inddsource: free review copy courtesy of the publicist
title: Isabella’s Heiress
author: N.P. Griffiths
published: Clink Street Publishing (February 25, 2015)
pages: 354
first line: The sun rose early that morning in Dresden.
rated: 3 1/2 out of 5 stars
writewritewrite1blustarhalf

blurb:
Newly dead and struggling to cope with her new reality, Emma Elliott is thrust into a dark and desperate vision of London. In her fight to survive she meets friends, both old and new, and uncovers a world inhabited by two warring clans of angels, one bent on the ultimate destruction of mankind, the other committed to our salvation. A way out presents itself but with the forces arrayed against her Emma starts to wonder why, of all the people who have found themselves in this position; she is being singled out for such special attention. As time passes more questions arise for Emma. Who is Isabella, the woman she is constantly mistaken for? Who are the mysterious Cado Angelus who cast a shadow over Emma’s every move? And what part does Emma have to play in the events that will soon unfold in her world and ours.

my thoughts:
Isabella’s Heiress opens on a battlefield in 1648 in Dresden. Isabella Calabria is leading the ranks and fighting when she disappears.
Fast forward to modern-day London, and to Emma Elliott who finds herself in a strange situation.

She is near London Bridge where she works, yet something is off. The priest father Eamon is with Emma and he explains to her that she has been in an accident has passed away and is now in purgatory. She has to stay here until it is decided where her soul will go next because she has unfinished business and because she also died too soon.

Continue reading