Serena’s Poetry Challenge February: Ask Me Why I Love You by Walter Everette Hawkins

As part of Serena’s Poetry Reading Challenge I will be sharing the poem I enjoyed the most that month on the last Tuesday of each month.
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One of the easiest, and possibly most difficult, will be getting people to sign up to read a poem-a-day through the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day service. The challenge is to read a poem-a-day for a week once per month and write about which poems were your favorite and why. You can write up a short blurb on your Facebook page, Twitter, Instagram, or your blog. I’d love for you to share your experience in the comments each month.

After reading a poem a day for a week in February, the one I enjoyed most was: Ask Me Why I Love You Walter Everette Hawkins. This was my first time reading this poet and I  enjoyed this one so much because I like love poems. I enjoy the way this poem flows, simply and beautifully. I like all the examples he gives to show that sometimes you can simply love someone just because you do…“And I will ask the flower why it loves the Summer sun…”. 

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Ask Me Why I Love You by Walter Everette Hawkins

Ask me why I love you, dear,
And I will ask the rose
Why it loves the dews of Spring
At the Winter’s close;
Why the blossoms’ nectared sweets
Loved by questing bee,—
I will gladly answer you,
If they answer me.

Ask me why I love you, dear,
And I will ask the flower
Why it loves the Summer sun,
Or the Summer shower;
I will ask the lover’s heart
Why it loves the moon,
Or the star-besprinkled skies
In a night in June….

What do you think of this one? You can read the poem in full here.

You can sign up for a Poem A Day over @ Poets.org

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Nothing in this post is available for download. The flower photo is my own.

Serena’s Poetry Challenge January: Farewell by Alice Dunbar-Nelson

As part of Serena’s Poetry Reading Challenge I will be sharing the poem I enjoyed the most that month on the last Tuesday of each month.

poetry

One of the easiest, and possibly most difficult, will be getting people to sign up to read a poem-a-day through the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day service. The challenge is to read a poem-a-day for a week once per month and write about which poems were your favorite and why. You can write up a short blurb on your Facebook page, Twitter, Instagram, or your blog. I’d love for you to share your experience in the comments each month.

After reading a poem a day for a week in January, the one I enjoyed most was: Farewell Alice by Dunbar-Nelson. This is not a poet I’d read before and I found her poem to be beautiful and bittersweet. I wonder if she wrote this about someone she personally could not be with and I wonder who that was. On reading more about the poet here, I found she led an interesting life and that she campaigned for the women’s suffrage movement.

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Farewell by Alice Dunbar-Nelson

Farewell, sweetheart, and again farewell;
To day we part, and who can tell
If we shall e’er again
Meet, and with clasped hands
Renew our vows of love, and forget
The sad, dull pain.

Dear heart, ’tis bitter thus to lose thee
And think mayhap, you will forget me;
And yet, I thrill
As I remember long and happy days
Fraught with sweet love and pleasant memories
That linger still

You go to loved ones who will smile
And clasp you in their arms, and all the while
I stay and moan
For you, my love, my heart and strive
To gather up life’s dull, gray thread
And walk alone……..

You can read the rest of the poem here. What do you think of this one?

You can sign up for a Poem A Day over @ Poets.org

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Nothing in this post is available for download. The sunflower photo is my own.

Making Discoveries: A guest post for The Bookworm Written by Jessica Goody

Jessica Goody Phoenix Cover Art

Hello everyone and TGIF. Please join me in giving a warm welcome to Jessica Goody author of  Phoenix: Transformation Poems  to my blog today as she stops by for a guest post and shares her poem titled Discoveries, just in time for National Poetry Month.

Making Discoveries: A guest post for The Bookworm

Written by Jessica Goody

I am endlessly fascinated by art, history, and the natural world, and all three deeply influence my writing. For most of my life I intended to become a marine biologist, and although my cerebral palsy prevented me from realizing that dream, I am an environmentalist, and much of my poetry is inspired by nature–especially the sea.

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An EveryDay Thing by Nancy Richardson

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source: free review copy via Poetic Book Tours
title:  An Everyday Thing
author: Nancy Richardson
genre: poetry
published: July 27, 2018
pages: 53

About:
Richardson’s poems concern coming of age in the rust-belt of Ohio during a period of decay of the physical and political structures that made the region once solid and predictable. Her poems chart the shifting of the foundations upon which a life is built and the unpredictability of events that have profound personal and political consequences, including the shootings at Kent State University.

My thoughts:

I love reading poetry, there is something special about it. I like it when poems conjure up feelings and emotions. I feel everyone interprets poems differently, it is a personal thing. I enjoy reading poems over and over again to get a feel for them. Today I am sharing my thoughts on a collection of poems called An Everyday Thing by Nancy Richardson.

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National Poetry Month: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

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April is National Poetry Month and I have been sharing a few of my favorite poems here on my blog. If you visit The Literature Network you can find the work of several authors to read and enjoy for free, like Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

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“How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death….”

This poem from Sonnets from the Portuguese: A Celebration of Love is a favorite. I love how she says “I love thee with the passion put to use…In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith. I love thee with a love I seemed to lose with my lost saints…”

What do you think? Enjoy your day and thanks for stopping in.

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disclaimer: Nothing in this post is available for download, the photo is my own.