I Am Legend by Richard Matheson

legend
source: purchased
title: I Am Legend
author: Richard Matheson
published: 1954
pages: 161
first line: On those cloudy days, Robert Neville was never sure when the sunset came, and sometimes they were in the streets before he could get back.
rated: 5 out of 5
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blurb:

It seems strange to find a 1954 vampire novel in Millennium’s “SF Masterworks” classic reprints series. I Am Legend, though, was a trailblazing and later much imitated story that reinvented the vampire myth as SF. Without losing the horror, it presents vampirism as a disease whose secrets can be unlocked by scientific tools. The hero Robert Neville, perhaps the last uninfected man on Earth, finds himself in a paranoid nightmare. By night, the bloodthirsty undead of small-town America besiege his barricaded house: their repeated cry “Come out, Neville!” is a famous SF catchphrase. By day, when they hide in shadow and become comatose, Neville gets out his wooden stakes for an orgy of slaughter. He also discovers pseudoscientific explanations, some rather strained, for vampires’ fear of light, vulnerability to stakes though not bullets, loathing of garlic, and so on. What gives the story its uneasy power is the gradual perspective shift which shows that by fighting monsters Neville is himself becoming monstrous–not a vampire but something to terrify vampires and haunt their dreams as a dreadful legend from the bad old days. I Am Legend was altered out of recognition when filmed as The Omega Man (1971), starring Charlton Heston. Avoid the movie; read the book. –David Langford

my thoughts:

Hello blog friends, I have been MIA and missed you all these few weeks but I did manage to read I Am Legend and wanted to share my thoughts on it. I’ve been busy with the usual work, family and just enjoying the summer. We even went on a mini-vacation to the beach last weekend. I’ll share pics on a Sunday post soon and I’ll be blog hopping this weekend and catching up.

Anyway, I picked I Am Legend out of left field really, it wasn’t a book I even planned on reading anytime soon but I found myself in a reading slump and this one helped get me out of that.
Richard Matheson wrote I Am Legend in 1954 and he set his futuristic post-apocalyptic thriller in 1976. The protagonist is Robert Neville, who has lived alone for a few years after losing his wife to a virus that infected most of Earth’s population and turned them into the living dead. The virus was thought to have been spread by mosquitoes after a war. Neville lives boarded up in his home, drinking often to ease the pain of his lone existence. He ventures out during daylight in search of food and supplies while also killing vampires. He spends his days trying to figure out the virus and how to cure it. I felt bad for him from the start. You get to see his past through a few flashbacks. I felt that Matheson wrote Neville’s loneliness and desolation masterfully and he was really creative with his storyline.

Horror he had adjusted to. But monotony was the greater obstacle, he realized it now, understood at long last. And understanding it seemed to give him a sort of quiet peace, a sense of having spread all the cards on his mental table, examined them, and settled conclusively on the desired hand.
p. 101, I Am Legend, Richard Matheson

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Dawn of the Algorithm by Yann Rousselot

al
source: free review copy via NetGalley
title: Dawn of the Algorithm
author: Yann Rousselot/ twitter
published: Inkshares (May 30, 2015)
genre: non fiction/poetry/science fiction poetry
pages: 60

Blurb:
Dawn of the Algorithm is an illustrated poetry collection that tackles topics ranging from robots and aliens to stock markets and street signs. In examining the dark side of the human experience, the collection reminds readers of the light in the world: the humor, the joy, and the love they can find even in the shadow of the ever-looming robopocalypse. By delicately deconstructing our humanity in the age of the internet, Yann Rousselot offers prophetic words of wisdom to the generations more connected to their iPhones than their emotions.

My thoughts:
Yann Rousselot has penned a unique set of poems with Dawn of the Algorithm. I liked the rhythm of the poems as Rousselot voices his thoughts through poetry with a science fiction theme.

sea levels rise to hot tub proportions
while our bath salts and scented candles
destroy entire ecosystems
a Body Shop apocalypse …

In this set of 33 poems, Post-Human Neo-Tokyo, Little Shop of Horrors and Blink Twice for No were among my favorites. Blink Twice for No especially as it is about what he wants to happen after he passes away one day.

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